How to write an About page that attracts your dream clients

When you’re trying to attract new clients, putting yourself out there can be intimidating.

What if people think you’re boring? What if they think you sound like an egomaniac? And how in the world do you explain the weird, winding path that led you to where you are today?

If you’d rather let your work speak for itself, you’re not alone.

Recently I was talking with a prospective client here in Portland about updates he wanted to make to his website when I realized something was missing. And that something — or, someone — was him.

His website was speaking to his ideal client, but wasn’t telling them anything about who they’d be working with if they hired him.

He needed to show up on his website. He needed an About page.

How to write an About page that attracts your dream clients | Kelsey O’Halloran, Copywriter

Why do you need an About page?

An About page is usually one of the most-visited pages on a website. And for many business owners, it’s the one they dread writing above all others.

But here’s the problem with hiding behind your work: if you don’t share your story, your website visitors won’t know how to differentiate between you and the thousands of other businesses who do what you do.

When I meet fellow entrepreneurs and prospective clients, often one of the first things they tell me is how much they enjoyed reading the story I shared on my About page. My About page has allowed me to start building connections with people before we ever meet face-to-face.

And as a small business owner, your story is what sets you apart. It’s time to own it.

 

How to write a compelling About page for your business

The best About pages are simple and relatively short. They tell your practice’s story — or your story — and they get straight to the point so website visitors can quickly understand what you’re all about.

In my client’s case, we started out by talking through a few questions to uncover the heart behind his business.

Then, I used a simple framework to write an About page that speaks to his client’s challenges, his story and how he’s uniquely equipped to meet their needs.

If your website needs an About page, here’s a framework you can use to tell your story and capture your ideal client's heart, without going on and on about yourself.

 

1 | Say hello

We’ll start with an easy one: your name.

Use the first line of your About page to introduce yourself. If your business is named after you, this could really be as simple as, “Hi, I’m [your name].”

If your business has a different name, then you can take this opportunity to add some context — “I’m [your name], the owner and [your role] behind [business name].”

 

2 | Give ‘em a smile

Next, near the top of the page, add a photo. Of you. Smiling.

I know, I know — this one can make some of us cringe. But it’s important to let your website visitors see the living, breathing human being behind your business.

If you don’t have a professional headshot, a well-lit smartphone portrait will do just fine for now.

The important thing is to capture your smile. A heartfelt smile can build trust, put website visitors at ease and help them feel more connected to you from the minute they land on your site.

 

3 | Share your mission

After your introduction, share your mission statement.

Since your mission statement briefly explains who you serve and how you help them, it’s a perfect way to quickly bring website visitors up to speed on what you’re all about.

If you don’t have a mission statement yet, you can use this simple framework to create one: “I provide [services] to help [ideal clients] get [desired result].”

 

4 | Connect to their struggle

It’s time to have a heart-to-heart with your client.

I know you’ve probably spent hours trying to get in your client's head and truly understand them. So use this section to show them you get them, you feel their pain and you’re here to help.

You can start by naming the problems, pain points or desires you know they’re already thinking about. Then, explain the specific services you offer to help.


5 | Tell your story

Most of us don’t think our own stories are that exciting. And as someone who leads a blissfully boring life, I can relate.

But the people reading your About page are there because they want to get to know you. They want to hear what you’re all about.

So it’s your job to tell them your story.

You can write about how you got started — and more importantly, why you did.

You can paint a picture of the earliest days of your business and show how far it’s come since then.

You can talk about the values that ground you and the dreams that drive you forward.

Your story is the heart of your business. And when it hits home with the right website visitor, it’s what will keep them coming back to you again and again.

 

6 | Own your expertise

If you’re first starting out, you probably won’t have a reputation to boast about, and that’s okay. 

But if you've earned relevant degrees or certificates, “best of” awards or ecstatic client testimonials by now, then by all means, give them a mention on your About page. These pieces will make your website visitors even more confident that they can trust you — and that you know your stuff.

 

7 | End with a call-to-action

Now that your website visitor knows who you are, how you can help them and what makes you unique, they just might be ready to take the next step.

So make it easy for them — include a clear call-to-action on your About page (and every page of your site, for that matter) to tell them what to do next.

 

Writing your About page

If you’ve been hiding behind your work, it’s time to start showing your face and connecting with website visitors.

It only takes a few simple steps. Start with a quick introduction and a friendly smile. Share your mission, connect to your client's struggle, tell your story and show your expertise. And as always, end with a clear call-to-action.

Now I want to hear from you. What are your biggest struggles when it comes to your About page? Are there any other elements you like to include besides those I mentioned? Share your thoughts in the comments below.